Outdoor

The do-it-all stability ball coaching

Stability balls – also known as exercise, fitness or Swiss balls – are a Home fitness staple. But Most of them sit uselessly in the corner of guest rooms, are emptied in cupboards or used as desk chairs. Since gyms remain closed or open at reduced capacity, now is the perfect time to finally use this tool.

We asked Kathleen Stabler, a fully certified Gym Jones trainer and owner of True North Performance Coaching in Albuquerque, New Mexico, to develop a core-centered full-body stability ball training session for outdoor and endurance athletes. Do this routine two to three times a week and do the exercises in sequence. "Really pay attention to the shape to get the most out of these movements," says Stabler. "As with all my workouts, this is much more difficult than it looks."

Stability balls are usually available in five diameters in ten centimeter increments and range from 45 centimeters (18 inches) to 85 centimeters (34 inches). When you sit on the ball with your feet on the floor, you usually want your knees to bend 90 degrees. "It is important to have the right ball," notes Stabler. "However, since we are in the middle of a pandemic, this training can be done with anything you have on hand."

Warming up

Complete five rounds of this mini-round, with no pause between exercises or sets. Gradually increase your speed and intensity each time and try to improve your efficiency and agility in the up and down transitions between movements.

  • Bear crawling: 50 feet forward, then 50 feet backward.

  • Running: 50 feet forward, then 50 feet backward. (You may need to go outside in this case.)

The movements

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Squat circles

What they do: Warm up the large leg muscles (quads, glutes and hamstrings) used during training, activate the core and increase the flexibility of the trunk and pelvis.

How to do it: Stand with your feet shoulder width apart in front of the exercise ball. Reach into your core and then squat (see: How to Squat Correctly) until your hips touch the edge of the ball. Weigh the ball partially, but keep your feet on the floor, your core strong, and your glutes engaged. Then work your hips clockwise and complete the entire range of motion as well as possible with good shape. Switch between clockwise and counter-clockwise directions with each repetition.

Volume: Two to three sets of ten reps in any direction.

Shoulder fly and snow angel

What they do: Strengthen the chest, shoulders, upper back, core and buttocks and improve the flexibility of the shoulders.

How to do it: This exercise combines two arm movements, one in a vertical plane and the other in a horizontal plane. Lie on your back, head and shoulders supported by the ball, knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Engage your core and buttocks to keep your hips with Your thighs and torso form a straight line parallel to the floor. Start with arms outstretched above you, with a slight bend in your elbows and palms together, and centered over your chest. Lower your arms to the side until they are parallel to the floor. Then swing your arms up parallel to the ground as if you were making a snow angel or you are Da Vinci's Vitruvian man. Go as far as your shoulder mobility allows, which can vary between the sides, says Stabler. Return each movement to the starting position for one repetition. Hold water bottles or dumbbells to make it more difficult.

Volume: Three sets of seven reps for every movement.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

One-leg deadlift with straight leg

What it does: Strengthens the hamstrings, glutes and core while training balance.

How it goes: Hold the ball over your head and push it between your palms to touch your shoulders and upper back. If the ball is too big for you, hold it in front of your chest. Stand on one leg and bend your knee slightly. Align your hips, reach into your core, then slowly swing forward on your hips and lift your free leg behind you until your torso and leg are parallel to the floor (or do so in a good shape as far as possible). Reverse the movement for one repetition. Keep your hips straight, your foot raised on the floor and your back straight throughout the movement. Focus on leg control and balance.

Volume: Four sets of six reps per leg. Do all the repetitions on one side and then switch to the other. Since you rest one leg while using the other, you don't have to rest between sets.

Carry out the next three exercises as a mini circle and switch from one to the next one after the other without a break between the exercises. Complete a total of four rounds with one minute rest between each round. Concentrate on slow and controlled movements.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

Eccentric squats

What they do: Strengthen the quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves and core by emphasizing the eccentric phase of the movement (lowering). They also attack the shoulders and upper back muscles.

How to do it: Hold the ball four to six inches in front of your chest and push it between your palms. Stand with your feet apart or slightly wider. Hold your chest and head up, pull your shoulders back and down, and keep your spine stacked in a neutral position. Then bend your knees and flip your hips forward to crouch for three seconds. Stop when your thighs are approximately parallel to the floor (or as deep as possible with good shape) and hold this low position for another three seconds. Then engage your glutes and push yourself through your heels to stand. Keep the ball steady throughout the movement.

Volume: Four sets of twelve repetitions.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

Crunches

What they do: Strengthen the abdominal muscles.

How to do it: Lie on the ball with your knees bent and your shoulders flat on the floor. Place your hands behind your head to support your neck with your elbows extended. Adjust your position so that your hips are at the edge of the ball and your lower back is supported. Then attack your core and sit up halfway. Slowly turn the movement back to the starting position for a repeat.

Volume: Four sets of twelve repetitions.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

Russian twins

What they do: Strengthen the core muscles with a focus on the oblique muscles.

How to do it: Start in the same starting position as above, but fold your hands together or hold a weight (e.g., a kettlebell or a gallon water jug) over your chest. Then turn your torso and arms aside. Twist your shoulders to follow your hands and resist any movement in your hips and legs. Turn the movement back to the center and then turn it to the other side. Keep turning back and forth, moving slowly and in a controlled manner. For an additional challenge, raise the opposite foot for each repetition: for example, if you turn to the right, raise the left foot.

Volume: Four sets of six reps per page.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

Squat plus push-up ladder

What it does: Strengthens the core, chest, triceps, shoulders and back muscles.

How it goes: This exercise combines two movements. Start in a standard push-up position with your arms straight, hands under your shoulders and feet together on the exercise ball (or put your shins on the ball to make it easier). Keep your body in a rigid plank from your heels to your head. Then put your knees in your chest as you roll the ball forward. Rotate the movement back to the starting position. Then do a full push-up. Start with a squat, followed by a push-up, and then do two squats and two pushups, three squats, and three pushups. up to ten repetitions in a row for each movement. Keep your core and back busy all the time.

Volume: One to ten repetition ladders for each movement. If this is too difficult, divide it into two sets of one to five conductors, with one to two minutes rest between sets.

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(Hayden Carpenter)


(Hayden Carpenter)

Get up sit up

What it does: Strengthens the core muscles with a focus on the abdominal muscles and hip flexors.

How it goes: Lie on the floor with your knees bent and your feet flat on your back. Hold the ball in a bench press position with your arms straight over your chest. Then sit up and at the same time lift the ball over your head in a flowing motion. Slowly turn the movement back to the starting position for a repeat.

Volume: 30 repetitions (or split into three sets of ten repetitions with one minute rest between sets). Do more when you're excited.

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Main photo: Melanie DeFazio / Stocksy

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